Station Approach flowerbed

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Pat Trembath
Posts: 613
Joined: 2 Oct 2004 10:54

Station Approach flowerbed

Post by Pat Trembath »

After several months of discussion the unloved, overgrown flowerbed at the top of Station Approach was cleared on Thursday by Glendale, restocked and handed over to Emini, our lovely cobbler in Station Approach, who has offered to look after it, keep it free from rubbish and restock as necessary. I'm sure a number of STF readers will want to pop their heads round the door of his shop to thank him.

Unfortunately the clearance of the overgrown flowerbed has resulted in uncovering damage to the brickwork of the wall which separates Sydenham Road from the drop down into Station Approach. The cause of the damage is obvious - roots from buddleia have grown into the wall. The bushes have now been cut back but will continue to grow unless treated.

I understand the only way to deal with this problem is to treat it with Round Up or some similar glyphosate product and I am also given to understand that only someone trained in its use should do this. A request for treatment during the slow growing season has been made. Only then can consideration of repairing the damage to the brickwork be considered.

mosy
Posts: 3998
Joined: 21 Sep 2007 20:28
Location: London

Re: Station Approach flowerbed

Post by mosy »

Thank you for the good news, and the bad news about the brickwork.

I don't know enough about glyphosate. Does anyone know if it can it be used as a systemic only? I'm wondering if the earth would have to lie fallow for ages otherwise if chemical residue would kill new things off.

If so, my best suggestion would be a covering layer of artificial grass (which hopefully wouldn't be nicked, lol).
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Any news yet on long-term disguising of the Turdis please?

Tim Lund
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Joined: 13 Mar 2008 18:10
Location: Silverdale

Re: Station Approach flowerbed

Post by Tim Lund »

Glyphosphate, aka Roundup, is a systemic weedkiller, and it is only relatively recently that concerns have been raised over its toxicity. Here is Wikipedia on the subject
Early epidemiological studies did not find associations between long-term low-level exposure to glyphosate and any disease. In 2013 the European commission reviewed a 2002 finding that had concluded equivocal evidence existed of a relationship between glyphosate exposure during pregnancy and cardiovascular malformations and found that "there is no increased risk at the levels of exposure below those that caused maternal toxicity." A 2013 review found that neither glyphosate nor typical glyphosate-based formulations (GBFs) pose a genotoxicity risk in humans under normal conditions of human or environmental exposures. A 2000 review concluded that "under present and expected conditions of new use, there is no potential for Roundup herbicide to pose a health risk to humans". A 2002 review by the European Union reached the same conclusion. A 2014 review article reported a significant association between B-cell lymphoma and glyphosate occupational exposure.
so to require its application to be done by someone trained in its use may seem unnecessary to some, but training will help in knowing when to apply it - so autumn is a good time, when plants are working on drawing down chemicals in their leaves to their roots and underground reserves for next year. But it also helps to avoid spraying when it's about to rain. I occasionally use Round Up, and am not too concerned at the risks I am running.

Pally
Posts: 1474
Joined: 2 Aug 2014 05:38
Location: Sydenham

Re: Station Approach flowerbed

Post by Pally »

It is great news that the flowerbed will be blooming soon and how great that. Emini is taking it on.

mosy
Posts: 3998
Joined: 21 Sep 2007 20:28
Location: London

Re: Station Approach flowerbed

Post by mosy »

Tim Lund said (re glyphosate) " training will help in knowing when to apply it ". Very true I reckon as apparently it's not an instant fix and can need several goes over months to eradicate determined "invaders". I looked it up a while back re rampaging cotoneaster but I daren't apply it in case the soil residue killed everything else off.

A couple of self-contained planters with perennial winter flowering polyanthus or February-flowering bulbs might be an idea since the planters could be set aside whilst brickwork repaired.

It is great that Emini shoemenders will maintain the space. Maybe people with spare plants or cuttings could help, although he'd probably rather we had more shoes to mend given that a lot are considered disposable these days.

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