Any DIY Problems??? Can I be of Help???

Friendly chat, questions, reviews, find old friends or relatives. Not limited to Sydenham only issues but keep it civil!

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lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Any DIY Problems??? Can I be of Help???

Post by lemonade »

Hello everyone,
There are so many dodgy contractors around who would think nothing of stitching unsuspecting people up for £1000's.
I have quite a broad knowledge in a good few areas....As I'm sure many of you do to.
My aim is to offer free advice for those who have any DIY problems.
I have good knowledge of electrical, telephone systems, some plumbing, flat-pack kitchen assembly, decorating, some building and ....well ask.
...If I don't know the answer and someone else does, please feel free to answer.
Go on give me a try!
SamC
Posts: 43
Joined: 17 Jan 2006 23:54
Location: Westwood Hill, Sydenham

Hi Lemonade

Post by SamC »

I came across this website by chance. This is my first posting. In fact i was looking for someone local online to sort out my cooker. i wondered if you will help me out a bit. i have recently moved to Westow Hill from Crystal Palace. My cooker does not seem to work properly. Before i moved the oven was working. i had cooked in the oven some chops. Since i have moved my cooker here it is not working. My dad said it could be the thermostat but it was a guess as he said it happened to him. It is about 3 years old and i can not afford to get another just yet. Please can you help. ?
Samantha
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Problem with your cooker

Post by lemonade »

Hello Samantha,
Firstly welcome to the forum. This may have been your first posting, but you're also the first person to reply to me out of over 100 people who've read my post.
OK you have a problem with your cooker... You mentioned you used your cooker before you moved and at the time it was working.
Can I ask you to provide me with the Model type/Number?
I would like to know is it just the oven you have a problem with? (ie, does the hob work?)
Meanwhile please check the following.....
Does your cooker have a built in timer/programmer?
Most modern cookers do and you stated your cooker is only 3 years old.
Check the timer/programmer (if fitted) is in the MANUAL position. Sometimes (& especially during handling) the timer can be mistakenly be switched to automatic.
Anyway check the timer/programmer first.
If this is not the problem, please get back to me with the make and model number and I'll see what else it could be.
Regards
Lemonade.
SamC
Posts: 43
Joined: 17 Jan 2006 23:54
Location: Westwood Hill, Sydenham

Hi Lemonade

Post by SamC »

:D :D A VERY BIG THANKYOU :D :D
Just to let you know i feel like such a fool. i did what you said and realised my oven timer was set to automatic. i must of touched the setting when i reset the clock. i have always found the timer too complicated for me and do not usually use it. i did not even think of looking at that. i would like to cook you a meal to say thanks for you excellent help and quick response. You have possibly saved me lots of money as i was looking through the argos to see for a new cooker. i can not affored one though so soon after xmas. If you would like to accept a home cooked meal made by me to you let me know and i will send you a personal message with my contact details. Thankyou once again.
Samantha
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Your Cooker

Post by lemonade »

Hi Samantha
You're most welcome. I'm glad your oven is now working and I was able to provide you with assistance. I am afraid I can't accept your kind invitation to a home cooked meal. As I've stated in my original post, I wish to offer my DIY knowledge FREE to any who ask. Also I don't think my girlfriend would be too pleased either. :)
Please feel free to ask any further questions regarding problems with DIY, home electrics, decorating, plumbing, etc. I will be more than happy to help.
Cheers
Lemonade
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

DIY

Post by lemonade »

D I Y P R O B L E M S C O N T I N U E D -

OK ladies & gents;

Come on any one else would like some free advice :?: :?: :?:

Please feel free to post a reply.
SamC
Posts: 43
Joined: 17 Jan 2006 23:54
Location: Westwood Hill, Sydenham

Central heating Radiator

Post by SamC »

Hi Lemonade. i would like to ask you, do you have any knowledge on how central heating radiators are hung on the wall. i am stripping some wallpaper from my living room. the radiator is in the way as i can not get to strip the wallpaper behind. the radiator has 2 pipes going to it at both bottom ends. do i have to have the central heating system drained down.? is this a specialist job or do you think i can do it.?
Once again thanks
Samantha
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Your Central Heating Radiators

Post by lemonade »

Hi SamC
You should be able to perform the job yourself provided you have the following tools or can borrow them;
1x 24mm spanner or large adjustable spanner or waterpump pliers.
1x 7mm spanner or small adjustable spanner
1x small philips screwdriver
1x bleed tool
1x shallow bucket/washing up bowl.

Firstly tighten the on/off regulator clockwise.
2) prize off the lockshield valve cover (it has a small white cover which lifts off)
3) You will notice a small square nut. Thighen the nut clockwise with the 7mm spanner/small adjustable spanner.
4) Starting at one side onlyUse the 24mm spanner/large adjustable spanner/waterpump pliers to unscrew anticlockwise the nut closest to the radiator. (the nut is horizontal) This nut screws the valve to the radiator. (NOT the nut which screws the valve to the pipework)
Make sure you use the shallow bucket/washing up bowl to catch the drips.
Tip...
Use paper towel around pipe to allow water to run straight into bucket and not along pipework.
5) Use bleed tool to slightly open the bleed hole, to let air push water out.
(As bucket fills shut bleed valve to stop drips whilst bucket is emptyed)
6) When radiator is empty, unscrew the other nut on the opposite side of the radiator.
7) Gently pull the pipe ends away from the radiator at both ends. (about 5mm each side)
8) Hold radiator on both sides (you may need a hand to do this as it may be heavy) Lift up and pull away from wall.

Please let me know if you intend to carry this out and if you experience any problems of need clarification with anything.
If you carry out this I will then let you know how to refit and bleed the radiator once you've finished decorating.

Don't forget...Any problems, please feel free to ask.

All the best
Lemonade
Illuminance
Posts: 84
Joined: 14 Mar 2005 16:49
Location: Tunbridge Wells

Re: Your Central Heating Radiators

Post by Illuminance »

lemonade wrote: 4) Starting at one side onlyUse the 24mm spanner/large adjustable spanner/waterpump pliers to unscrew anticlockwise the nut closest to the radiator. (the nut is horizontal) This nut screws the valve to the radiator. (NOT the nut which screws the valve to the pipework)
:idea: May I suggest a second large adjustable spanner/wrench is used to support each valve whilst undoing the radiator nuts, to prevent the copper tube from kinking or completely snapping off.

Also, store the radiator upside-down (ie: valves in the air) - the black sludge (which is a result of the pipework oxidising) that sits in the bottom will permanently stain your carpet.

All the best everyone!
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Central Heating Radiators

Post by lemonade »

Good call Illuminance!
You sound like you've done a few yourself.
Cheers for your added good tip.
Regards
Lemonade
SamC
Posts: 43
Joined: 17 Jan 2006 23:54
Location: Westwood Hill, Sydenham

My radiators

Post by SamC »

Hi lemonade. thankyou for getting back to me. what you say seems a bit complicated but i want to try it. i have not got most of the tools. my brother said he will lend me some of his friends. hopefully my brother and i can tackle it together. i will let you know how we get on and i may have to message you again if i get stuck.
thankyou again
Samantha :)
Weeble
Posts: 358
Joined: 1 Nov 2004 17:56
Location: Sydenham

Post by Weeble »

OK - I've got a chimney issue. Perhaps not one where a definitive answer can be reached online, but I'll try.

We have an upstairs flat in an early 1900's conversion. We want to knock out the chimney breast in the kitchen and use the space to install a cooker.

The flat downstairs have done this, but I've been told this may not be possible upstairs due to the flue from the downstairs flat.

Any ideas?
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Your chimney

Post by lemonade »

Hello Weeble
Yes that's certainly a tricky one to answer online.
From what you have told me I'm a bit confused why it would effect the downstairs flat. If the downstairs flat has knocked away their chimney breast in order to enlarge their room, I don't see any reason why you can't.
Can you see behind the chimney breast's structure? Is there a continuous sealed flue running from top to bottom?
Besides you and the flat below, are there any other tenants with similar rooms using a flue above yours or below the lower flat?
Hope this is of help
Lemonade.
Weeble
Posts: 358
Joined: 1 Nov 2004 17:56
Location: Sydenham

Post by Weeble »

Thanks Lemonade.

Sorry I don't think I explained myself very well - downstairs haven't knocked out the chimney entirely, but have installed a cooker in the chimney breast, with a extractor fan which uses the flue.

We thought that if they could do this downstairs, we could do the same thing upstairs, but I think the configuration could be different due to the flue from downstairs running up the chimney. It is a converted 2 storet house with an upstairs and downstairs flat.

Anyway, I've got a man coming to look at it over the weekend - I'll let you know how we get on!
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Your chimney

Post by lemonade »

Hello Weeble
Judging from what you've said, I think you may be able to do almost the same as the flat below.
Normally the flue is offset further back against the wall or in the wall itself.
So you may be able to knock down the chimney breast if the flue doesn't protrude. However if it does, it may not be possible.
Yes, for best advice, have it looked at by an expert.
Good luck
Lemonade
JR
Posts: 18
Joined: 24 Jan 2006 10:31
Location: Thicket Road

Hey lemonade

Post by JR »

Hey lemonade,

I meant to ask you a question within another thread but it has not gone thru properly. :?

I have a 1948 house. There is a dividing wall which sections off the dining room area and the kitchen. The wall is made of plastwerboard and is hollow. It has got wood within I think to hold the plasterboard. About a year ago my daughter held a party and the wall ended up getting kicked and as a result has a 4 inch hole in one side.

I want to know is there a way I can fill it or do I have to pull down that particular sheet of plasterboard :?: I cannot use normal polly filler because it falls behind in the cavity. It is too low to put a picture over it.

Do you have any suggestions please :?:

Cheers, JR :D
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Hole in plasterboard

Post by lemonade »

Hello JR
The hole in your plaster board can certainly be repaired. This is normally quite an easy repair.
There are a few ways to remedy the situation. I will present you with the following 3 options:
1) Get some old newspaper, roll it up in a ball and stuff it into the hole. Fill the remaining void(s) with a flexible filler, one that can be sanded and overpainted.
2) Get a piece of cardboard which is a couple of inches larger than the hole itself. Make 2 small holes about 1" apart in the centre of the cardboard. Pass a piece of string through, leaving about 12" remaining. Hold onto the string and at the same time fold the larger cardboard into the smaller hole. Pull the string and then you can fill the remaining void with filler with similar properties as the above.
3) The Bridging Method; As you stated the hole is about 4". Get some pieces of wood in strips about 1" wide and about 6" long. Feed each piece one at a time and glue the ends of each to the inner side of the plasterboard. Use a strong glue such as "No More Nails" as this will set strong and quick. Then fill the remaining void with filler as above.
Either of the 3 examples would work. Personally I prefer the last method.
Let me know how you get on.
Lemonade.
JR
Posts: 18
Joined: 24 Jan 2006 10:31
Location: Thicket Road

Hey Lemonade

Post by JR »

Hey there Lemonade,

I very much appreciate your good advice. I opted for your 3rd suggestion.

I used some timber pices which I cut to the required length. I bought some very strong glue called Liquid Nails. The filler was easy to fill in with a wallpaper scraper and I did not even need to sand it down. I have just finished re-painting it.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude for your excellent help.
:D :D :D :) :) :D :D :D

Cheers,

JR.
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Plasterboard Repair

Post by lemonade »

Hello JR
You're most welcome. I'm pleased the repair has worked well for you.

I've just read a reply you've sent to BET, Re: Beauty Salon treatment for her friend. - I realise you were having a giggle, but to be honest I find it slightly rude what you've written.
After all, I will be 40 this year too!
Lemonade.
lemonade
Posts: 144
Joined: 25 Oct 2005 23:01
Location: Croydon

Re: DIY

Post by lemonade »

lemonade wrote:D I Y P R O B L E M S C O N T I N U E D -

OK ladies & gents;

Come on any one else would like some free advice :?: :?: :?:

Please feel free to post a reply.
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